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Tupperware- Does it really work?


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#1 AK2

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 12:42 PM

I'm looking to boost our family income a little and it's hard not to be swayed by all those fancy 'Earn Extra Income for Virtually Nothing' advertisements.

I've had countless friends and family members become direct sellers over the years (Tupperware, Mary Kay, Nutrimetics, Avon, you name it!) and none of them have experienced any real success, most of them dropped out within 12 months.

I'm a Marketing student at university, so feel like I'd actually have a pretty good handle on promoting products (and my business) but I'm a little worried that the market is already saturated with SAHM's who sell stuff.

So......do you think it's worth a shot? If you tried it, did it actually boost your income at all?

#2 mango

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 12:51 PM

I tried tupperware, but to be honest I wasn't in a very good head space for it. It was just after Ri was born and I basically just wante out of the house away from him and his screaming. ph34r.gif

I think whats important is passion for the product. If you don't love it and use it then how are you going to sell it. Also you need to have friends that will hold parties to get you started but not only that they have frends that will come and book parties. You rely on bookings and if the interest isn't there then your not going to get far.

#3 ♥ Emsie ♥

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 01:08 PM

There is a lot of money to be made in direct selling if you are good at it!

My honest advice is go for a consumable product and not Tupperware.

Don't get menwrong I love Tupperware, but because of it's lifetime guarantee, once you have something, you have it for life. That and the market is absolutely saturated with t/ware consultants. They boast a 33% commission, when in actual fact after your expenses it comes down to 20% which is on a par with any other company.

With a consumable product like body shop, mark Kay, nutrimetics etc you will get a lot more repeat customers.

The key to any direct selling is booking parties, not sales. the sales come on their own, but if you run out of parties you are constantly starting from
Scratch.

To really make a business out of it you need to recruit and build a team underneath you.

Can you tell I've done a lot of party plan? Lol!!

In summary, there is a lot of money to be made if you know what you're doing smile.gif

Hope this helps smile.gif
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#4 Pretty Mrs Kitty

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 01:14 PM

I started selling Avon because I didn't know anyone who sold it and I wanted to buy some.
I told all my friends & family that I sell Avon so they can buy from me.
I gave my friends & family catalogues to pass out to their friends & family so they can buy from me.
Then I took on a territory so I could canvas for more people to sell to.

I've been selling Avon since November and I've consistently sold $100 of stock each campaign (approx 3 weeks). Mostly through my mums work, bens work and a friend but I also picked up 6 new customers through my territory.

You would have to be extremely proactive and willing to approach strangers to seek new business to acheive big results. Its really a numbers game - the more people who know your a rep will mean the more people likely to buy from you - the average sale for me is $30 so if I can build my business to have 10 people buy from me each campaign rather than 3 I could be making some real money.

I'm not very good at the "speak to 3 new people everyday" thing but I am trying. And I'm not pushy - I let people buy what they want not convince them to get stuff they don't need.

Its kinda like a mortgage - you chip away at it in the beginning, keep it for a long time, and one day you've suddenly paid a heap off and its showing its benefits. laugh.gif
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#5 Monica

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 01:15 PM

My cousin is now a director in Mary Kay and making a small fortune.
I think she has at least 25 consultants in her team and some of them do really well also.
She works it though, she does 2-3 classes a week for her consultants and countless parties. The last I ehard she was in-line for the pink car biggrin.gif

I think on aveage she can bring in around $3k a month (in income, not sales) - she does also have a beauty salon though which helps her to sell stock.

Totally agree with Emma, you need something that people are going to continue to want to buy, not tuppaware

I do it simply to get my own supply for free. I place an order of $500 or so a quarter which gives me $500 of stock free for me
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#6 *Ms Jessica*

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 02:28 PM

QUOTE(♥ Emsie ♥ @ Feb 17 2011, 02:08 PM) View Post

There is a lot of money to be made in direct selling if you are good at it!

My honest advice is go for a consumable product and not Tupperware.

Don't get menwrong I love Tupperware, but because of it's lifetime guarantee, once you have something, you have it for life. That and the market is absolutely saturated with t/ware consultants. They boast a 33% commission, when in actual fact after your expenses it comes down to 20% which is on a par with any other company.

With a consumable product like body shop, mark Kay, nutrimetics etc you will get a lot more repeat customers.

The key to any direct selling is booking parties, not sales. the sales come on their own, but if you run out of parties you are constantly starting from
Scratch.

To really make a business out of it you need to recruit and build a team underneath you.

Can you tell I've done a lot of party plan? Lol!!

In summary, there is a lot of money to be made if you know what you're doing smile.gif

Hope this helps smile.gif



I recommend everything Em has said. If you are willing to put the effort in you can make good money from direct selling.

As Em said, your main focus is booking, I do The Body Shop and usually the products sell themselves, it's maintaining those bookings that guarantees the sales.

Also once you start recruiting and getting bonuses for that is when it really pays off.


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#7 Thelma

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 02:31 PM

My Mum is looking at selling thermomixes and the lady was telling her that those who do well are those that treat it like a business, not a hobby. You need to get out there and promote it and whatnot, not just wait for business to come to you. And you also need to think longterm. Initially it will be hard and you'll just slog it out with friends, but eventually more and more people know about you and business will come to you easier.

#8 AK2

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 06:21 PM

Some really good tips here smile.gif

QUOTE(♥ Emsie ♥ @ Feb 17 2011, 01:08 PM) View Post

My honest advice is go for a consumable product and not Tupperware.


This is something I've been thinking about- I was reading some stuff today and a lot of consultants were complaining because their clients could get Tupperware off eBay for so much cheaper, they'd stopped booking parties. I also agree that you could tap out your friend/family base really quickly, a person only needs so many rock n serves!

QUOTE(Pretty Mrs Kitty @ Feb 17 2011, 01:14 PM) View Post

I started selling Avon because I didn't know anyone who sold it and I wanted to buy some.
I told all my friends & family that I sell Avon so they can buy from me.
I gave my friends & family catalogues to pass out to their friends & family so they can buy from me.
Then I took on a territory so I could canvas for more people to sell to.


This gave me a lot to think about- I have been leaning a little more towards Avon, being something that is a repeat performance and a lot of people are happy to buy from a catalog dropped at their front door (I haven't had a local Avon lady for years!). My Mum loves it too- she'd probably keep me in business for years to come laugh.gif


QUOTE(Monica @ Feb 17 2011, 01:15 PM) View Post

My cousin is now a director in Mary Kay and making a small fortune.
I think she has at least 25 consultants in her team and some of them do really well also.
She works it though, she does 2-3 classes a week for her consultants and countless parties. The last I ehard she was in-line for the pink car biggrin.gif


Wow, that's a lot of money! There is a success story there!

I agree with what everyone has said about it being a business, not a hobby. Funnily enough I actually took over my Mum's Avon business when I was about 12 (she got sick of doing in) and I was soon making $15-$50 in pocket money every campaign. I think I know what it would take to run the business side of things (having a couple of business qualifications help there). I'm beginning to think that maybe it's worth a shot- with no start up cost, I really cant' loose, right?


#9 bluenomi

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 07:00 AM

I know 2 people who sold Tupperware.

One did it as a hobby and found she was spending all her profit buying tupperware for herself and once she had 2 kids she just didn't have the time for parties etc so she stopped. She nows sells Avon mostly for fun and never has parties but get s constant run of orders from us friends. She doesn't make much money off it but she gets her stuff for free

The other one really got into it, moved up the ladder really quickly (she got to the get your own tupperware car level within a year) and is making so much money from it that her husband culd afford to quit his high paying but horrid job for a better much lower paying one.

It really comes down to how much effort you are willing to put into it. If you don't like the idea of hitting up everyone you know to have a party it's not for you biggrin.gif
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